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The State of Theology survey reveals evangelicals are unorthodox

“The State of Theology” survey published by Ligonier Ministries in the last couple of days focused on evangelical responses to various theological questions. The statement “Everyone sins a little, but most people are good by nature,” received over 50% agreement from evangelical Christians. And the statement: “Jesus is the first and greatest being created by(…)

The Dealer’s Prayer

Recently I had my first experience in a car dealership. The gentleman, kind enough, took us on a tour through the vast array of used cars. We had a budget in mind and we also had a fine mechanic whom we called if we had any questions (Thanks Eddie Hobbs in Pace) Our budget was(…)

The Glorious Reformation

It has been a long time since I have been actively engaged in debates over TULIP–commonly known as the Five Points of Calvinism. I came to these convictions in college. In fact, I remember when the very mention of the word “Calvinism” was seen as a violation of all that is sacred. I remember a(…)

Calvin on Psalm 46

Explaining the significance of the psalmists’ first words in Psalm 46, Calvin writes: …the faithful have no reason to be afraid, since God is always ready to deliver them, nay, is also armed with invincible power. He shows in this that the true and proper proof of our hope consists in this, that, when things(…)

Tyranny of the Unknown

Our tendency to isolate ourselves is grounded in several factors. One reason we usually avoid the company of fellow brothers and sisters stems from a stream of endless hypothetical situations about what might happen should I actively pursue community. “But what if they see me as I really am?” “What if they perceive me to(…)

New Mercies: Communion Meditation

Long ago in a small little village, far away, there was a great fire. The residents frantically ran to fill up buckets of water attempting to minimize the damage to their little village. But the fire was all consuming. It spared nothing. The next day the villagers—exhausted from their labors—wept as they saw what remained(…)